Legendary B-Girl ‘breaks’ in Brundidge

Published 7:17 pm Friday, May 27, 2022

Breaking is now entering a new light on the international stage at the 2024 Olympic games in Paris.

But, before Paris, break dancing came to Brundidge.

On Thursday afternoon, legendary B-girl Honey Rockwell was at the Patti Rutland Jazz Studio in downtown Brundidge to conduct a breakdancing workshop along with her husband, B-boy Orko and two instructors at the couple’s Rockwell Dance Academy in Acworth, Georgia.

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Honey Rockwell is from South Bronx and is a pioneer B-girl who has expanded her performance career that includes three world tours and off-Broadway performances and a dance academy that includes workshops across the country.

“Breakdancing is the fruit cocktail of all the genres of dancing and gymnastic,” Honey Rockwell said. “What I love about break dancing is that you defy gravity, that you feel the dance, that you push the envelope. Break dancing is infectious; there is no other form of dance like it.”

Rockwell said, in the beginning, acrobatics and music inspired the moves. But now, breaking is much more codified,

“Flying, power moves, spins, kicks and control are all key elements that have elevated modern breaking to new heights including the Olympics,” she said.

Rockwell said the sky is the limit of what breaking can bring forth to a community. “I’m excited for the kids.”

And, on Thursday afternoon, the excitement and amazement of breaking was evident at the Patti Rutland Dance Studio in Brundidge. The B-boys showcased the acrobatic movements that are particular to breaking, from jackhammers to head slides and head spins.

Even Patti Rutland was amazed.

The young dancers included several kids that were brand new to dance.

“And, they all started on the same level of breaking, Rutland said.

“We are excited to bring this dance to the studio here in Brundidge,” she said. “The kids were smiling and excited as they watched K-Rock’s demonstration. “They were amazed when they saw the strength and athleticism that is required in breaking to do the flips, dives and spins on the back and on the heads and the other moves that comprise break dancing.”

Honey Rockwell said she will be back in Brundidge every other month to ‘break” with kids

Rutland said, when Rockwell said she will be back, cheers when up from the young dancers.

“Several of them said they were going to practice so they will be stronger next time,” she said. “They are excited about the opportunity to learn this form of dance and we are excited to able to bring professional dancers and instructors to Brundidge to teach them.”

Rutland said the first year in Brundidge has been wonderful and the studio is continuing to blaze trails into the world of dance.

For Rutland, the Brundidge studio is the realization of the dream she has had to have a studio with a wall of windows looking out on a main street where passersby can see the magic that is dance.

“The studio here in Brundidge reminds me of Abbeville where I started 45 years ago,” Rutland said. “The windows look out on … Main Street. The legacy that I will leave in dance continues here and I am thankful for the opportunities that lie ahead and those who will be a part of it all.”