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Troy, Brundidge offer free walking tours in April

The cities of Troy and Brundidge will be on display along with other towns across the state during Saturday mornings in April as part of the Alabama Tourism Department’s April Walking Tours.

The Pike County Chamber of Commerce coordinated the April Walks in Pike County last year and will be an active participant again this year.

Kathy Sauer, Chamber president, said the walking tours are great ways to get out and enjoy the spring weather while learning more about hometown history.

“Alabama is the only state that holds statewide, simultaneous walking tours,” Sauer said. “As a chamber of commerce, it is exciting that we have two cities in our county that participate. Last year, the response was very good for all four walking tours in Troy, and the turnout for the Brundidge tour was outstanding. We expect to have good participation again this year.”

A variety of community leaders will lead the free tours through the historic districts or courthouse square areas of their hometowns.  Statewide, the hour-long tours will start at 10 a.m. on April 4, 11, 18, and 25.

The walking tours in Troy will begin at the Chamber office on 10-A East Church Street and will be led by the Chamber staff and the Pike County Historical Society.

On April 4 and 18, the walking tours will be around The Square in downtown Troy. College Street will be featured on April 18 and again on April 25.

“The April 25 walking tour will be in conjunction with TroyFest, and John Phil McLaney, Pike County Historical Society president, will lead that tour,” Sauer said. “The College Street tours will be architectural tours, but we will not go inside any of the homes.”

The date of the Brundidge Walking Tour will be announced later. The “talking the walk” tour will be led by several residents who will share stories about some of the town’s most notable business “characters” during the walk.

Sauer said the walking tours are opportunities for residents to learn more about the history of their communities and the people of influence who helped shape them.

“One of the benefits of the walking tours is that many of those who participate have stories and histories to share,” Sauer said. “We encourage all of those who have an interest in community history to be contributing members of the tour.”

Sauer said, although the tours will have leaders, insightful information is also welcome.

“On a College Street walking tour last year, someone mentioned that one of the houses is reported to have a ghost,” she said. “The ghost story added to the tour. So, we invite everyone to plan now to participate in the walking tours in Troy and in Brundidge.”

Brian Jones, with the Alabama Tourism Department, is coordinating the statewide tours.

He said more than 2,000 walking tours have been conducted since the beginning of the program 12 years ago, and the tours increase in popularity every year.

More information about the April Walking Tours is available on the Alabama Tourism Department website at www.alabama.travel.