• 72°

Special game

For an event that happens every four years, shouldn’t the Olympics mean something besides to the people who are competing in it?

I guess not.

I caught some of the Opening Ceremonies coverage last Friday night and when I asked whether anyone else saw it [including the very end where the likes of Wayne Gretzky and Steve Nash stood awkwardly as the final torch lighting malfunctioned] the responses I received were either laughs or “the Olympics are going on?”

As the late-great Rodney Dangerfield used to say, “No respect, no respect I tells ya.”

And what a shame it is.

The world’s finest athletes coming together for two weeks every four years and what does everyone do to honor this moment? They turn the channel to see what Snooki is doing on “Jersey Shore.”

Now, NBC is not necessarily helping thanks to their apparent inability to show the games live, but rather showing them hours after the results have already been broadcasted to the world [talk about an company that hasn’t been on the top of it’s game in the past couple of months, let alone years].

I for one am and have been excited.

Having been to Olympics before, I have a pretty good understanding and appreciation for what’s happening on the West Coast.

Plus, for a hockey fan like myself – it doesn’t get much better than this.

Whether or not people believe curling and snowboarding or sports [they aren’t] these are still the Olympics Games.

This a time where people can and should take pride in their respective country – be proud of what’s going on.

People seem to do this for events like the World Cup, so really, what’s the difference?

These games are when some of the most recognizable moments in sports history have taken place like Jesse Owens in Berlin or the “Miracle on Ice” at Lake Placid.

It’s moments like these that only happen once or twice in people’s lifetime – and sometimes, every four years.