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SARHA supports ‘Heart Truth’

Although heart disease is generally associated with men, the truth is that heart disease is the number one killer among women, jumping from 34 percent in 2000 to 69 percent in 2009.

“Significant progress has been made in increasing awareness among women that heart disease is their number one killer but most fail to make the connection between its risk factors and their personal risk of developing heart disease,’ said Christy Hill, SARHA health educator. “The numbers tell the story. Heart disease kills one out of every four American women.”

Bringing public awareness to heart disease among women is paramount in “The Heart Truth” campaign and SARHA has joined the efforts to reduce the number of heart disease related deaths among women.

“SARHA employees joined ‘The Heart Truth’ campaign on Friday, Feb. 5, which was National Wear Red Day to help spread the message that ‘Heart Disease Doesn’t Care What You Wear, It’s the Number One Killer of Women,’” Hill said. “SARHA is committed to the health and well-being of women.”

While heart disease risk begins to rise in middle age, heart disease develops over time and can start at a young age, even in the teen years.

“It’s never too early or too late to take action to prevent and control the risk factors for heart disease,” Hill said.

“‘The Heart Truth’ campaign is building awareness of women’s heart disease and empowering women to reduce and prevent their risk.”

The campaign is reaching women with important health messages in community settings through a diverse network of national and grassroots partner organizations.

February is National Heart Month and the fundraising campaign for the Pike County Chapter of the American Heart Association is underway.

The culminating event for the 2010 campaign will be the Pike County Heart Walk from 5 until 7 p.m. on Feb. 18 at Cattleman Park. The public is invited to attend and take advantage of the opportunity to learn more about “The Heart Truth” and other campaigns that seek to reduce the number of deaths related to heart disease and stroke.