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Jim Medley honored as parade grand marshal

Jim Medley, a native of New Brockton who has Brundidge at heart, will be honored by the Brundidge Business Association as the grand marshal of the 2009 Independence Day Parade on Saturday.

Delatha Mobley, BBA member, said Medley is a perfect choice for the annual honor for many more reasons than she could name.

“This honor is long overdue for Jim,” Mobley said. “He has been an invaluable part of our community for many years. He has been involved in just about everything of real importance that we have done as a business organization and as a community. He is a committed community servant and well deserving of the honor.”

Medley’s community service record is as long as the distance been Brundidge and the place of his birth.

His interest in the business community is evident in his willingness to serve in leadership roles in the Brundidge Chamber of Commerce and then the county chamber when it was organized and again with the Brundidge Business Association.

Medley was a member of the Brundidge Rescue Squad for 20 years and is a longtime member of the Brundidge Rotary Club.

His commitment to community extended to its youth. Medley’s three children attended the county schools in Brundidge and was a member of the PTO organizations and served as president of the elementary school PTO for several terms.

He was the assistant scoutmaster of the Brundidge Boy Scout troop when Reynolds Wallace was scoutmaster and then scoutmaster for four years. Medley is a member of the Order of the Arrow and was honored with the Silver Beaver Award, a distinguished service award given to adult leaders.

His commitment has been just as strong to his faith and his church. He is a deacon at Salem Baptist Church and also teaches the older men’s Sunday school class.

Medley takes great pride in his country which he served in Army’s security agency from 1957-60.

But, all that Medley does, he does with humility.

“Ohhhh …. I water the flowers in the sidewalk planters,” is the way that Medley describes his community service, every bit the unassuming community servant.

“I’m honored to be the Grand Marshall of the Independence Day Parade,” he said. “It’s nice to know that people appreciate your efforts but there are many others as deserving or more so than I am. I’ve just tired to be involved and do what I could over the years.”

It was that desire to have a positive impact on the community in which he lived that brought Medley back to small town Southeast Alabama.

After spending time with Uncle Sam, he traveled several years with the Department of Agriculture. During those travels he met his future wife, Linda, in a faraway place called Caribou, Maine. Her dad was a potato inspector and he invited Medley to dinner one night and introduced him to his daughter.

“For a while it seemed like my career would be in large city markets and I didn’t want to do that” Medley said.

“This may sound corny but I felt like I had more to offer in a smaller place where I could be a part of the community. So we came back home to Southeast Alabama. And, I’ve had no regrets. Sometimes I’ve wondered what would have happened if … but, no. No regrets.

“We’ve had a wonderful life here in Brundidge. It’s been great. Linda and I have a wonderful family and now I’m working two days a week at First National Bank and we have time to travel. Life’s worked out really good for us. We’re a part of a wonderful community and I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.”