• 79°

Wright’s photography on exhibit

Once again, the Johnson Center for the Arts is offering a unique arts opportunity for the people of Pike County, South Alabama and beyond.

“People’s Lives,” a photographic celebration of the human spirit by Texas photographer Bill Wright opened Jan. 12 at the Johnson Center for the Arts.

Richard Metzger, Johnson Center executive director, said the exhibition is one that will open the eyes of all viewers to the world around them in such a way as to touch their hearts.

“Bill Wright is an amazing environmental portrait photographer,” Metzger said.

“He photographs people in their own environments, whether it be the front room of their house or their backyard. Not only are his photographs portraits of the people, they tell stories about their lives.”

The Bill Wright exhibition includes 53 black-and-white photographs of people around the world.

“Their faces tell a story,” Metzger said.

“They tell the stories of two Cuban girls and their dogs, a construction worker in Aha Lung Nature Preserve, a Chinese girl in Tumulke Village in China, a couple in Breckenridge, Texas and other people around the world.

Metzger said, as he studied the children in Wright’s photographs, he saw the joy that was expressed in the faces.

“They were just kids hamming it up for the photographer,” Metzger said.

“No matter what their environment is or where it is, children are children the world over. Bill Wright’s photographs make us realize that it is a small world.”

Wright seems to capture the inner beauty of those he photographs as few other photographers can.”

“He has such a strong sense of composition and design,” Metzger said.

“He uses light and shadows so effectively. And, he does it using silver gelatin, which is the old darkroom technique that gives his photographs a special and rare quality.”

Everyone is invited to visit the Johnson Center for the Arts and view the Bill Wright exhibit.

As always, there is no admission to the museum. The hours are 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and noon until 5 p.m. on Sunday.

The exhibition is made possible through HumanitiesTexas.