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Love chats with Troy voters

Candidate for the 2nd Congressional District Rep. Jay Love took a stop on his campaign trail to get to know locals in downtown Troy Thursday.

“The best part about running for office has been coming into small towns and meeting people in small cafes like this,” Love told residents eating lunch in Byrd’s Drugs. “People in this town are great, God-fearing people.”

Love took a minute to chat with those downtown about the economy, small business and the presidential race.

“In this state, we’ve been blessed to weather the economic storm better than a lot of states,” Love said.

But, he said fixing the economic crisis is at the forefront of what needs to be done for residents in Pike County, as well as neighboring ones.

“What we can do to stabilize the economy is the most important thing we can do for the people of Pike County,” Love said.

Love said the answer for the economic crisis was not a $700 billion bailout, but rather, putting more focus on smaller industry.

“I would have stopped and tried to put focus on small and medium sized businesses,” Love said.

By creating long-term plans for small business and encouraging more investment and expansion in them, Love said the economy would boost naturally.

Taking a stop in Douglas Brothers Jewlery, Love was welcomed with support and promised votes by the small business’s employees.

Employee Ivy Witherington told Love he had her vote before he even came to visit, and according to her, he may have many other local votes, as well.

“Most people I know don’t want Bobby Bright, but I’m more concerned about the presidential race,” Witherington said.

Love said the presidential race is a big concern for him, too, as national polls indicate John McCain is down.

“I’m really concerned about the direction of the country and where it’s going,” said Love, who was the first congressional candidate to advertise support for the McCain/Palin ticket.

Pike County’s Republican Chair Adam Drinkwater said Love represents the needs of the county, and the local party will back him in the polls.

“I think he stands for small business and rural Alabama values,” Drinkwater said. “I think he understands what it means to be a business owner, to make a payroll and work within a budget, and he will put us on the path for a better and stronger future.”