Archived Story

City considering new fencing regulations

Published 11:05pm Monday, June 11, 2012

Do-it-yourselfers, put the nails and hammers down if you are building a fence in Troy. There are newly proposed rules to consider.

“These regulations establish guidelines and help define gray areas,” said Melissa Sanders, the city’s planning and zoning administrator, adding that the guidelines were project designated by the planning commission.

The Troy City Council will have the first reading of the changes at a scheduled meeting tonight and the updates come recommended by the planning commission.

Some of the changes, Sanders said, include clarifying what materials can be used to make fences, fence height and fence placement.

Any front yard fence, Sanders said, must be “50 percent open,” such as a picket fence, and not more than three feet high. Along the street, that fence can be no higher than two and a half feet tall.

That’s for the safety of drivers, neighbors and people whose home is inside the fence.

“If there isn’t a clear view of your home from the street, it is a safety concern,” Sanders said.

Backyard fences should not exceed six feet high, commercial fences can be up to eight feet and industrial zoned fences shouldn’t be more than 10 feet high.

“Many other cities in Alabama have regulations similar to these,” Sanders said. “These changes will assist the building official and zoning department in enforcing regulations fairly.”

Height restrictions and clearer definitions of walls and hedges are also included in the proposed changes.

Sanders said something that people may not be aware of is the need to obtain a permit before building a fence. Fences must be inspected after they go up, as well. Those requirements will not change.

And if home or business owners already have a fence, hedge or wall that doesn’t meet the proposed changes they’ll be grandfathered in and not have to tear down any existing structure should the alterations and clarifications pass. However, Sanders said, that’s only true if the structure isn’t expanded or completely replaced in any way.

“These rules are to preserve the appearance of Troy and to avoid traffic and safety hazards,” Sanders said.

 

  • Joyful1

    Good fences make good neighbors! I understand not causing traffic problems, but as long as houses are very visible, why should the height of the fence in the back yard matter? Some yards have extreme slopes, so in order to have any privacy at all, a fence needs to be taller than 6 feet. Please allow for waivers so that common sense can be allowed to prevail.

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    • http://www.troymessenger.com Robbyn Brooks

      Oh, let me add this thought (I should have included in the story, now, I see). People who would like to build outside these parameters or who have special building needs can still go before the Board of Adjustments with their request. Sorry for any confusion!

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  • Prophet

    Such foolishness as this is why intelligent people are moving out of the limits of most cities and leaving them to become slums and dilapidated structures as Detroit is now. Why are they worried about fences when sections of Troy are as i described above? Seems they need to get their priorities in order to me.

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  • Truth Hurts

    What part of private property did I misunderstand when I paid for my land, my home, and my taxes on that property? If you want to pay part of my bills you can have some input on what I do with it.

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  • patriot2009

    Just another way government can extort money from us.

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  • http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/dwsmith.htm Bamabunny

    I have to agree with what everyone said here. I can understand a front fence obstructing a view but why should another property fence such as a side or rear fence be such a concern?

    I know a few home owners that could use a good privacy fence to keep their junk in the back yard private so others don’t have to look at it.

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  • WDM

    Just another reason I live in the country.

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  • bobby1jay

    Wait a minute, you can see through a chainlink fence, so what does it matter how high it is.

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  • hometowngurl

    ooooh man what a mess ..
    this is becoming communist you buy and pay taxes an WORK YOUR BUTS OFF FOR IT AND who EVER WANTS TO IN OFFICE can have all the say sooo about what you want to do ..
    COME OOOON PPL WAKE UP !!!!!!

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  • hometowngurl

    you got that rite bobby!!!!

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  • hometowngurl

    it must have one of the brains from troy state ideas!!!

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  • topnotchtungsten

    Personally, I see nothing wrong with fencing regulations. Too many participants are getting poked in the eyes by errant sabers and the mesh on the masks needs to be strengthened. Also, they should be required to wear cups whether male or female.

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  • John Mullis

    Ms. Brooks,

    My question why does the city of Troy wish to have a code that violates the fencing codes of the state of Alabama?The State of Alabama is a fence out state,this means that in order to prosicute a person for trespassing or livestock at large fences must be built to state codes and not Troy codes,for illiagle fences are treated in the courts as non fences.The city of Troy is mandating agenda 21 and sustainable growth mandates which was made illiagle when both houses passed unopposed and signed as law sb 477 and that no city,muncipality,county or the state could pass ordinances designed by agenda 21 or sustainable growth issued by the United Nations.Please research codes of Alabama on fencing laws.

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  • Harry

    Odd I’ve never noticed many fences around Troy that would be offensive to most people . Does the city pay someone to dream up all the regulations that the public does not want ?

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  • Trojan97

    Troy is beginning to sound a lot like Naples Florida. It won’t be long before you’ll be getting a notice on your door by a code enforcement officer if your grass is higher than they think it should be. Troy is not headed in a good direction when they begin to regulate what you can do with your own property. You’ll need a permit to get a permit before too long!

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    • topnotchtungsten

      I wonder how Naples’ utility rates and sales tax measure up against Troy’s? Hmmm… something to ponder I suppose.

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    • Bill_OReally

      …yet they never have and never will enforce the Zoning Laws regarding groups of college students living in single family dwellings.

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  • Observer

    When you live within a municipality you trade the benefits of the community for some of the liberties you would have in the country. You can raise hogs and chickens in your front yard out in the county but not in the city.

    I wonder, what is the safety concern if your house is not clearly visible from the street? Do we have that much of a problem with drug dealers putting up high fences to keep police from seeing what they are doing that we have to legislate fences for everyone?

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