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Employees and customers at Byrd Drugs got a sneak peek Thursday at the first edition of  “Alabama Road Trips: 52 Great Getaways,” published by the Alabama Tourism Department. Shelia Jackson, Troy director of tourism, said the county’s inclusion in the getaway guide will promote local businesses and attractions statewide. Pictured, Jackson, seated, and from left, Cathy Catrett, Kristen Rawson and Mona Jackson.
Employees and customers at Byrd Drugs got a sneak peek Thursday at the first edition of “Alabama Road Trips: 52 Great Getaways,” published by the Alabama Tourism Department. Shelia Jackson, Troy director of tourism, said the county’s inclusion in the getaway guide will promote local businesses and attractions statewide. Pictured, Jackson, seated, and from left, Cathy Catrett, Kristen Rawson and Mona Jackson.

Archived Story

Great getaway

Published 11:26pm Thursday, April 10, 2014

Art, pioneers, peanut butter and more Pike County attractions are featured in the Alabama Tourism Department’s first edition of “Alabama Road Trips: 52 Great Getaways.”

In the foreword, award winning novelist Rick Bragg tells of his grandfather who “heard the song of the blacktop all his life” but mostly went looking for something “in no place in particular.”

That’s kind of the way with the Alabama Road Trips. When folks go looking for no place in particular, they often find places that are particular. Places that are special and make life richer because of the experiencing of them.

Shelia Jackson, Troy director of tourism, said Pike Countians can take pride in that Pike County is featured in the first edition of “Alabama Road Trips.”

“It’s a beautiful and informative publication and the Alabama Tourism Department is to be congratulated,” Jackson said. “The book showcases so many good things that Alabama has to offer – from the mountains to the beaches and everything in between. Thumbing through the book you realize what Alabama has to offer to us as residents of this great state and to tourists.

“As the article says, there’s a lot to love about Pike County – an emerging arts scene, the pioneering spirit, a top-ranked university, antiques an annual peanut butter party and more.”

The Pike County Road Trip begins on the square in Troy and highlights the downtown shops, then travels to Troy University, which is on The Princeton Review’s “Best in the Southeast” list.

“The Pioneer Museum of Alabama, with its 22 historic structures and 18,000 artifacts, is featured along with the Johnson Center for the Arts as must see places when in Troy,” Jackson said. “The Troy Arts Council is recognized for its commitment to bringing world-class entertainment to the stage.”

Adams Nut Shop and Glass Studio and Sisters Restaurant are suggested stopping places along U.S. Highway 231 to Brundidge. Adams is an award-winning artist and Sisters serves the banana pudding that earned a spot on the “100 dishes to eat in Alabama before you die.”

The article highlights Brundidge downtown businesses and the We Piddle Around Theater that is home to Alabama’s Official Folklife Play, “Come Home, It’s Suppertime,” the Pike Piddlers Storytelling Festival and other folklife events. The “wacky metal sculpture” of artist Ronald Godwin is said to be worth the drive by.

“Of course, TroyFest and the Peanut Butter Festival are spotlighted,” Jackson said. “Those festivals annually attract thousands of people from all walks of life and from near and far.”

“Alabama Road Trips” puts Pike County on the road trip map and Jackson said the benefits could be far reaching. With the price of gas continuing to go up, people will be looking for places to go and things to do closer to home,” she said. “The people of Alabama will be no exceptions.”

‘Alabama Road Trips’ is a great guide to seeing Alabama first or for the first time.”

 

 

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