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Sims named new TES principal

Published 11:00pm Monday, June 10, 2013

Theresa Sims was hired as principal at Troy Elementary School on Monday.

Sims, who has been vice principal of the school, will replace Juan Henderson, who resigned earlier this year pending an out-of-town move with his family.

Lee Hicks, superintendent of the Troy City Schools, said the recommendation to hire Sims as principal was a unanimous one made by the search committee.

“We had a six-member team, with three teachers and three administrators,” he said prior to the meeting. “It was a unanimous decision by all on the team.”

Sims will move into the principal role effective July 1. Meanwhile, Henderson said he will continue to work through the transition.

“I just want to say thank you to the administration and the parents for trusting me with your children,” Henderson told the board and the audience gathered. “It is a great day to be a Trojan, and there are a lot of good things happening.”

Sims’ hiring was one of nine personnel recommendations considered by the board on Monday. The others unanimously approved by the board included one retirement, James Renfroe at the Troy-Pike Center for Technology, and six resignations: Joy Felch, Troy Elementary kindergarten special education teacher; Jenny Meadows, Charles Henderson Middle School library aide; Jason Eastering, CHMS school support aide; Ryne Rials, CHMS special education aide; Kira Aaron, Charles Henderson High School English teacher; and Jonathan Pennington, CHHS special education aid.

The recommendation to transfer LaTanya Threadgill from CHMS science teacher to CHHS science teacher passed three-one, with board members Wally Lowery, Roxie Kitchens and Dr. Judson Edwards approving the recommendation and Jason Thomas opposing it. Threadgill had written a letter to board members contesting the transfer.

In other business on Monday, the board accepted the final external report presented by AdvancED, as part of the accreditation process.

“To have our system come through this will all 3s, and high 3s at that, is a credit to our teachers and to the ladies who worked to get this information together (for the accreditation),” Hicks said.

During the academic report, the board heard presentations on two summer programs at Troy Elementary School: the pre-K summer program and the Reading-Math-Science-Technology Academy.

“Our main goal is to help children make a smooth transition into kindergarten,” explained Emma Fluker, who heads the pre-K academy. The eight-day program is offered to students who are already enrolled for the fall term of kindergarten and helps prepare them for the school environment and the learning process. In addition to a basic curriculum that focuses on letter and number recognition; social skills; and reading basics, the academy also prepares parents for the expectations of kindergarten.

“We educate the families on what they’ll need to know for kindergarten next year,” Fluker said.

The Reading-Math-Science-Technology academy is a combination of separate reading, writing and math and science summer programs, said Carolyn Hampton, coordinator. More than 115 students are enrolled, and they rotate between activities in each of the four core areas.

“We’re focusing on authentic learning experiences,” Hampton said, as she invited participating students to come forward and share their work with the board.

Students presented results of their science experiment (how high a basketball bounces on asphalt, tile or carpet); fractions lessons (recognizing and adding fractions with the aid of layered, colored salt; and how to create PowerPoint presentations (including one student’s “all about me” presentation she shared with the board and audience).

“As you can see, we have lots of authentic experiences for children to learn,” Hampton said. The academy is open to rising third-, fourth- and fifth-graders.

In other business, the board:

• Approved a minibus and four vehicles as surplus to be sold.

• Accepted the financial statement, although sales tax figures were not yet available.

• Recognized the Charles Henderson High School Baseball team, which won the Class 4A state championship.

 

  • Pauly D

    Approving sell of a “short bus” and resignations of multiple special ed teachers – coincidence?

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  • Pauly D

    Mr Henderson further stated that he would like to make a toast to Mrs Sims.

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  • Pauly D

    “the academy also prepares parents for the expectations of kindergarten.”

    This is a great idea. 78.245% of the parents that send their children to TES couldn’t pass kindergarten themselves. Nice job recognizing this issue and getting out in front of this.

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  • gottaloveit

    Really? We have reached a point that a “program” is needed to prepare kids for kindergarten? And that parents need to be educated on the expectations of kindergarten? This is scarey! I say if these folks don’t know what to expect by now, we’re going to need to set aside more than 8 days to “prepare” and “educate” them. Let’s not leave any child behind…

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  • Truthhurts

    Anyone notice the teacher turn over rate this year? This is not a coincidence. The teachers are not happy with the leadership of the superintendent.

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  • Fountain loves AISA

    They are getting rid of everyone who’s not publicly demonizing PLA and calling anyone a racist who is not sending their kids TCS.

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  • BH1880

    The Alabama Department of Education has released graduation rates for the 2011-2012 school year. The state of Alabama had a graduation rate of 75%. The total graduation rate for Troy City Schools was 58%. The graduation rate for individual city schools is as follows: •Charles Henderson High School – 58%

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  • Observer

    How can a school board approve a financial statement which is incomplete? If you don’t know how much revenue is coming in, you cannot know how much more of the reserves will be required to cover the expenses.

    Not a word about Robin Snyder being removed as softball coach although the Dothan Eagle gave the story extensive coverage?

    Keep on celebrating the baseball team winning the small school championship, maybe nobody will notice the report that the system’s graduation rate is an abysmal 58-percent, among the lowest in the state.

    There is bound to be more to the story of a teacher who objects to being transferred and the board splits 3-1 with one absent or not voting. If the Messenger is going to report this personnel action it should at least report the basis for objection and the administration’s response.

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    • areyoukiddingme

      Have you ever thought that Snyder may have had to much on his plate? He is in charge of the whole middle school football program and he has a family. He wasn’t “fired” from being the softball coach he was asked to step down which probably plays into his advantage since he was doing all he could and just filling in as coach for the time.

      A “small school championship” that’s the biggest school and championship that’s been won by any school around here in a while. Way to support your community through all of there achievements.

      The 58% graduation rate is what is reported from the 2011-2012 school year which has nothing to do with this past 2012-2013 school year which everyone keeps confusing. None of this has to do with Hicks because he wasn’t even here. If you wanna hound someone hound someone who was atleast here like the old superintendent or the principal. There were also miscalculations in numbers so I’m sure that graduation percentage will rise.

      BH1880 if you wanna hound the public school system a legitimate comparison would sound better. Private schools may have 98% graduate and 94% go in to college but look at class size between public school graduates and private school graduates and the difference in size there probably has just a little to do with that.

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      • Observer

        Robin Snyder was not asked to step down. He was called in and told he was no longer the softball coach. It had nothing to do with what was on his plate. The decision had been made.

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  • Fountain loves AISA

    You should read the Dothan Eagle article. Coach Snyder didn’t seem to think they were doing him a favor.

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    • areyoukiddingme

      No coach is going to publicly say he’s happy about stepping down from a coaching position. He’s a compassionate man for sports and loves helping kids improve with there athletic abilities. He wants what is best for the kids rather that be with him as coach or not. He’s a true Trojan man and wants what’s best for the kids, school system, and athletic program.

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  • Fountain loves AISA

    I know a guy that was a trojan man, until he made a personal choice to send his kids to different school and the administration came up with a BS excuse to get rid of him.

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    • areyoukiddingme

      Well in that case, I have no idea who your talking about and don’t mean to offend anyone, he wasn’t a true Trojan man. A Trojan man would be loyal to his school through tough or easy times. No ones perfect and no one school or another is perfect they all have there flaws.

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      • Observer

        Samuel Johnson observed in 1775 that “Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel.” Loyalty runs a close second.
        It is always interesting to hear people insist on some virtue in being loyal to an institution, especially when they are defending not the institution but its agents.
        In the case of parents who are employed by an institution the obligation of loyalty to the children takes precedence over any claim of loyalty on the part of the institution when the parent believes what is best for his child is not what the institution is offering.
        Loyalty to the school or school system may require an individual to fight against its agents when the individual becomes convinced that the agents are not doing what is best for the institution and its clientele.

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  • Pauly D

    True Trojan man? That sounds like some wacko Auburn family BS. This further goes to show that if you aren’t in lockstep with the Hicks disciples you are an outcast. The “not a a true trojan man” I believe you are referring too has done more for TCS than Hicks ever will-as has his family. Not to mention he has more ethics and morals than Hicks could ever dream of having.

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  • areyoukiddingme

    And that statement goes to prove that you are a self-opinionated person who doesn’t like new ideas or new people. You have got to be open minded in today’s world. And if this so godly “true Trojan man” your talking about did so much then why did he leave? Were his opinions on things the same as yours, that’s why you praise him, and they failed so he left? At least Hicks is still around to try to help instead of abandoning ship.

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  • Pauly D

    And you aren’t self opinionated? Maybe the “so called Godly true Trojan man” you refer too just wanted to try something new. Hicks has been here 2 years. Lets discuss loyalty if he is here in 10 years. Why wasn’t he loyal to Prattville? Why did he abandon that ship? You don’t have to answer with some BS because I am sure all the issues that ran him off from there were misreported too – just like the inaccurate reporting of the TCS horrible academic performance.

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    • areyoukiddingme

      I’m not self opinionated at all. I stated a fact saying that Hicks has nothing to do with the 2011-2012 school year people are blaming on him when he was even in office for that school year. If someone’s to blame it shouldn’t be the superintendent. He puts a course of study together and has a staff such as teachers and principals who apply these study’s to high school kids. The Alabama course of study is set up to be challenging to make sure kids are educated not just knowing enough to get by. There’s several different options in high school to take on getting an education that range from a regular course of study which is knowing the essentials for life and then there’s advanced courses of study that prep kids for college. If a student doesn’t pass or graduate on time it’s the students fault for not doing what they’re needing to do. Teachers, principals, superintendents, and so forth do there jobs the right way so whose fault is it if they don’t graduate? The teachers and administrators or the students?

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  • Pauly D

    If students fault, no wonder people send kids to PLA and county schools. No one wants their kid in class with 42% of the kids who cant graduate because they would bring the other kids down.

    At least TCS is saving money on diplomas, if nothing else.

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