Pike County residents gathered on the square in downtown Troy Thursday at noon as the 2013 Bible Reading Marathon came to a close with a service for the National Day of Prayer.
Pike County residents gathered on the square in downtown Troy Thursday at noon as the 2013 Bible Reading Marathon came to a close with a service for the National Day of Prayer.

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Prayers of the faithful

Published 11:00pm Thursday, May 2, 2013

Marathon concludes with National Day of Prayer service

With the reading of Revelation 22:21, “The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all. Amen,” at 8:35 a.m. Thursday, the 2013 Pike County Bible Reading Marathon officially came to a close.

However, readers continued to read, beginning with the Gospel According to Matthew, until the noon hour which marked the beginning of the National Day of Prayer service at the Gazebo on the square in downtown Troy.

Troy Mayor Jason A. Reeves was the final reader for the Bible Reading Marathon and closed with the words: “Salt is good: but if the salt has lost its saltness, wherewith will ye season it? Have salt in yourselves and have peace one with another.”

Ken Baggett, director of the sponsoring Salem-Troy Baptist Association expressed appreciation to those who participated in the Bible Reading Marathon and those who supported their efforts.

Baggett said that 360 readers were needed to read in 15-minute segments over the 90-hour period.

“It is good that we have the opportunity to publicly share the reading of God’s Word,” Baggett said.

Traditionally, the Pike County Bible Reading Marathon concludes with a prayer service at noon on the National Day of Prayer.

Dr. Rick Lance, executive director of the Alabama State Board of Missions, was the guest speaker. Lance quoted I Timothy in saying that prayers should be made for all men.

“We should pray for all people,” he said. “There are five prayer requests that all believers should make.”

Using the hand as a point of reference, Lance said the thumb represents self.

“First, we must pray for self purification so that we can be fit vessels,” he said. “We must get our hearts right. Then, the little finger, which is the weakest of all the fingers, we should pray for those who are suffering.”

The index finger, Lance said, represents power.

“We should pray for those who are in earthly authority,” he said. “We should pray for the servants. Then, the tall finger. It represents the lost souls. Those who need to come to Christ. And, the ring finger represents service. We must pray for opportunities for service to others.”

Lance said the right hand and its five fingers should be constant reminders of the prayer requests of all believers.

In closing, Lance urged those in attendance to consider who will be gathered at a National Day of Prayer service in years to come because of their witness and their influence.

“Who will be here because of you?” he said.

 

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