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African American Read-In today at TPL

Published 11:00pm Tuesday, February 26, 2013

The Troy Council Teachers of English will host an African American Read-In from 4 until 6 p.m. today at the Troy Public Library. The African-American Read-In features professional African American writers and is free and open to the public.

The Read-In is being held in conjunction with the 24th National African American Read-In, said program host Dr. Patricia Waters, Troy University English Department.

“This event is both a celebration of the literary arts and promotion of literacy within the community,” Waters said. “The students in my Young Adult Literature class and members of the Troy Council Teachers of English will read selections of their choice of works – poetry, information books, short stories, folk tales, picture books and young adult literature – by African- American authors.”

Teresa Colvin, TPL children’s and young adults’ librarian, said this is the third year that the Troy Council Teachers of English has hosted the African American Read-In.

“The Read-In generates more interest each year,” Colvin said. “The African American Read-In is held in honor of our history and the readers have made a decided effort to make the readings interesting and entertaining.”

Colvin said that, if the children’s books are short, they will usually be read in their entirety. Excerpts will be read from longer books, as with young adult and adult selections.

“The readers will choose passages that will make listeners want to read the book,” she said. “Some readers will actually do a short book talk and poetry is popular among the readers as well.”

Colvin said the African American Read-In introduces listeners to African American authors and poets who are the “cream of the crop.”

“We hope that everyone will take advantage of this opportunity here for them,” Colvin said. “With the support of the International Reading Association, this event has become an international celebration of reading.”

The Read-In has been endorsed by the International Reading Association. More than a million readers of all ethnic groups from 48 states, the District of Columbia, the West Indies and African countries have participated. The goal is to make the celebration of African American literacy a traditional part of Black History Month activities.

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