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Ala. lawmakers speak out about ‘no budget, no pay’ bill

Published 11:00pm Thursday, January 24, 2013

After Republicans sped legislation through the House earlier this week, two of Alabama’s lawmakers in Washington are speaking about the push for the Senate to pass a budget for the first time in four years.

The bill, coined “no budget, no pay,” would withhold Senate or House members pay if either group fails to draft a budget.

The legislation received bi-partisan support from the House with a vote of 285-144 and would also permit the Treasury to borrow more than the limit of $16.4 trillion through May 18 to hold off the threat of a government default. Speaker of the House John Boehner noted that Republicans would quickly draft a budget that would wipe out deficits in a decade and challenged Democrats to do the same.

Rep. Martha Roby (R-AL) said she voted for the bill to demand the Senate finally pass a “responsible budget.”

“Families do it. State legislatures do it. City councils do it. Even student councils do it. Yet, for four years the Senate has failed to pass a budget,” Roby said. “It’s beyond irresponsible; it’s downright reckless, and it ends now.”

Roby pointed out that it has been more than 1,360 days since the Senate passed a budget to outline federal funding and set spending levels. She said continued failure to complete that responsibility threatens the nation’s economic future by forcing the government to operate on temporary spending bills that pile up more debt.

“If they do not, if they fail to pass a budget, then they – the Senate – will be threatening the full faith and credit of the United States. No more long-term increases in the debt limit without meaningful and responsible reductions in government spending. No more kicking the can down the road. No more operating without a budget.”

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) is a ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee and said he is “gratified” that the Senate plans to offer its first budget in four years.

“It certainly won’t be easy to put this nation on a sound financial course,” Sessions said, “but it is essential. Needed fiscal changes will not only prevent an economic nightmare but they will reduce growing poverty, dependency, and joblessness and help more Americans live free and prosperous lives. Republicans are eager to work on this important endeavor and look forward to the commencement of committee activity.”

The Senate is expected to approve the debt bill as early as today.

After Republicans sped legislation through the House earlier this week, two of Alabama’s lawmakers in Washington are speaking about the push for the Senate to pass a budget for the first time in four years.

The bill, coined “no budget, no pay,” would withhold Senate or House members pay if either group fails to draft a budget.

The legislation received bi-partisan support from the House with a vote of 285-144 and would also permit the Treasury to borrow more than the limit of $16.4 trillion through May 18 to hold off the threat of a government default. Speaker of the House John Boehner noted that Republicans would quickly draft a budget that would wipe out deficits in a decade and challenged Democrats to do the same.

Rep. Martha Roby (R-AL) said she voted for the bill to demand the Senate finally pass a “responsible budget.”

“Families do it. State legislatures do it. City councils do it. Even student councils do it. Yet, for four years the Senate has failed to pass a budget,” Roby said. “It’s beyond irresponsible; it’s downright reckless, and it ends now.”

Roby pointed out that it has been more than 1,360 days since the Senate passed a budget to outline federal funding and set spending levels. She said continued failure to complete that responsibility threatens the nation’s economic future by forcing the government to operate on temporary spending bills that pile up more debt.

“If they do not, if they fail to pass a budget, then they – the Senate – will be threatening the full faith and credit of the United States. No more long-term increases in the debt limit without meaningful and responsible reductions in government spending. No more kicking the can down the road. No more operating without a budget.”

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) is a ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee and said he is “gratified” that the Senate plans to offer its first budget in four years.

“It certainly won’t be easy to put this nation on a sound financial course,” Sessions said, “but it is essential. Needed fiscal changes will not only prevent an economic nightmare but they will reduce growing poverty, dependency, and joblessness and help more Americans live free and prosperous lives. Republicans are eager to work on this important endeavor and look forward to the commencement of committee activity.”

The Senate is expected to approve the debt bill as early as today.

 

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