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Tour of Pike Co. Pocosin now open

Published 11:00pm Thursday, October 18, 2012

For many, the Pocosin of Pike County has been somewhat a mystery. For years, it was thought that only two such places existed, one in Pike County and the other somewhere in Germany.

But, that was just the lore of the land. There are many other such unique bio systems but the Pocosin is nonetheless a remarkable place to visit.

Those who would like to tour the Pike County Pocosin are invited on a guided tour of the area from 10 until noon on Thursday, Oct. 25.

The tour is made available to the public through the coordinated effort of the Pike County Treasure Forest, Troy University, the Alabama Forestry Commission, the Whitetail Institute and the Pike County Farm City Committee.

The tour, hosted by forester Robert Brown, will organize at the Alabama Forestry Office on Elm Street. The tour will be conducted from open-air trailers and there will be seating for about 80 people. The cost of the tour is $5 and includes a barbecue lunch.

Biologist Robert Frank Deese, with the Whitetail Institute, will conduct the tour.

“He is a knowledgeable guide and will be pointing out the unique features of the Pike County Pocosin,” said Randy Hale, chair of the Pike County Chamber of Commerce Farm-City Committee.

Troy University Chancellor Dr. Jack Hawkins and State Rep. Alan Boothe have provided assistance in making the tour of the Pocosin available to the general public.

“This is an opportunity not to be missed,” Boothe said.

“Most folks have heard about the Pike County Pocosin but have no idea of the unique wildlife and plants that exist in this small area.”

The Pike County Pocosin is owned by Troy University and Alabama Forever Wild. The area is closed except when being used by Troy University biology students.

For more information about the tour, call Keith Roling at 334-808-1404.

 

  • BH1880

    When dose the cost get too high, when dose the government take too much? The program has taken money from the trust fund and private land for 20 years. Hunting is allowed, that is for 2 days a year. Why have locks remained on most land? Why are national forest, public lakes, state parks, public water ways, etc. not included in government ownership-that is not taxed? Every one agrees that land should be preserved, but not 50% of Alabama taken away for government ownership.

    http://www.notforeverwild.org/news.htm

    http://www.notforeverwild.org/docs/Not_Forever_Wild%282b%29_wilcox.pdf

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  • Bill_OReally

    The money is from a trust fund set up for Forever Wild to receive from the gas and oil industry. It is specifically earmarked for Forever Wild. None of the money comes from taxpayers. So what do you suggest they do? Just stop taking the money from the gas and oil industry? What is the beef? You want the money to go in the general fund where it can just be wasted on some other government program?

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